Enderby consultation meeting 25 June

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Hard Hat, the communications/PR consultants working for Barratt on the Enderby Wharf site, is holding a meeting on the development proposals in Greenwich on Wednesday 25 June at 18.00.

Barratt is already demolishing the existing property on the site – part of Alcatel-Lucent’s historic cable factory, where most of the world’s undersea telegraph and telephone cables were made from the 1850s to the 1970s. You can see the demolition site in the picture above, taken in May 2014. Alcatel-Lucent’s remaining buildings are in the distance.

The meeting is at the Sherard Hall at the Forum @ Greenwich, which is in Trafalgar Rd, London SE10 9EQ (click here to see on Google Maps).

Hard Hat is holding the meeting at 6pm because its previous meeting – on 27 March – was in the afternoon, too early for many people. Let’s hope Southeastern Railway is having a good day and people can get there on time. Nearest station: Maze Hill.

Anyway, put it in your diary. We’ll be reporting on the meeting here on www.enderby.org.uk

If you plan to attend, please let Joshua Lindsay of Hard Hat know on jlindsey@hardhat.co.uk or 020 7636 6603 — at least so that they can put out enough chairs.

Barratt’s site about the proposed development at Enderby Wharf is here.
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Why is Enderby Wharf so important?

From the 1850s to the 1970s Enderby Wharf in Greenwich is where people made most of the undersea cables that connect the world’s telegraph, telephone and now internet networks. More than 160 years after the first cables were made there, a factory behind Enderby Wharf still makes vital equipment for subsea cables to connect the world’s internet services.

 

It was where the world’s first telegraph cables were made in the 1850s, pioneering technologies that for the first time allowed people to send and receive messages in minutes rather than days or weeks.

 

The people who worked at Enderby Wharf have had a leading role in building the technologies that connected the world — from the 19th century telegraph networks to the international phone networks of the 1970s to the internet today.

 

In its first 100 years the Enderby Wharf factory made 82% of the world’s subsea cables, 713,000 km of cable.

 

We hope you agree and will want to help us work to secure the future of Enderby House and the cable-loading gear on the river bank. If you’d like to get in touch with us, click on “about” for names, email addresses and phone numbers